Trans Generational Effects of Male Age on Son's Mating Success, Acps and Sperm Traits in D. melanogaster

Rezaei, Abolhasan and Krishna, M. S. (2015) Trans Generational Effects of Male Age on Son's Mating Success, Acps and Sperm Traits in D. melanogaster. New York Science Journal, 8 (1). pp. 73-84. ISSN 1554-0200

[img] Text (Full Text)
ZOO_2015_Rezaei.pdf - Published Version

Download (547kB)

Abstract

Studies on human and nonhuman organisms have shown that the quality of gametes decreases with increasing of male age. Paradoxically, in many taxa, female prefer to mate with older males; however the adaptive significance of such preference is not clear until today due to lack of studies involving accessory gland proteins (Acps) and sperm traits. We used both cross sectional and longitudinal approaches to study male age effects on sons mating success, accessory gland proteins and sperm traits in D. melanogaster. It was noticed that in D. melanogaster, females of all age classes discriminated between sons of different male age classes and preferred to mate with sons of young males more frequently than with the sons of middle aged and old males. In pairwise mating, sons of young males showed a significantly greater courtship act compared to sons of middle aged and old males. In turn, females showed least rejection responses to the sons of young males than towards the sons of middle aged and old males. Further, sons of young males with smaller accessory glands, with a few larger main cells in their accessory glands, had produced greater quantities of Acps and were able to transfer significantly greater quantities of Acps and sperms to the mated females. As a result, females mated with them had greater fecundity and fertility than those mated with sons of middle aged or old males. Further, the sons of young males lived longer but females mated with sons of young males shorter life. Thus, our study suggests that with increasing of male age, the quality of gametes increases, resulting in reduction of Acps, and sperm traits of sons. Thus females of D. melanogaster obtain indirect genetic benefits by mating with young males.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Offspring Quality and Male Age and Copulation Duration and Accessory Gland Proteins
Subjects: B Life Science > Zoology
Divisions: Department of > Zoology
Depositing User: Shrirekha N
Date Deposited: 12 Jul 2019 05:44
Last Modified: 12 Jul 2019 05:44
URI: http://eprints.uni-mysore.ac.in/id/eprint/5112

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item